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Dog Hair Genetics 2

Submitted by rmirley on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 23:53

Retrievers are either black or brown depending on whether TRP-1 and TRP-2 are synthesized. If TRP-2 and TRP-1 are synthesized then the retriever is black, but if only TRP-2 is synthesized then the retriever is brown. In the case of a yellow lab however, neither TRP-1 or TRP-2 are synthesized. This is due to a mutation in the MSH gene that changes its conformation. Because of the change in conformation, the MSH can no longer bind to the MSH-R. The MSH-R is what signals to produce the TRP-1 and TRP-2 that causes pigmentation. This is what causes the hair of the yellow retriever to never become pigmented.

Dog Hair Genetics

Submitted by rmirley on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 22:27

Retriever dogs have three distinct phenotypes. There is the black phenotype, the brown phenotype, and the yellow phenotype. The difference in expression between the black and brown phenotype comes down to the production of two enzymes: TRP-1 and TRP-2. All retrievers produce tyrosine, which when reacted with tyrosinase forms dopaquinone. TRP-2 then reacts with the dopaquinone to create the brown pigment, which then reacts with TRP-1 to form the black pigment. Black is the dominant color of the two because it takes only one signal to produce both TRP-1 and TRP-2. There is a mutation in the recessive allele that causes only TRP-2 to be produced, causing the pigmentation to halt once it reaches the brown pigment. 

Methods Paragraph 3

Submitted by rmirley on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 21:19

Finally, the multipanel figure was constructed. There were three main panels consisting of a picture of the full plant, a picture of a close up of the flower, and the figure showing the plant’s origin. The multipanel figure was set up so that there was a long image on the left side and two stacked images on the right side. The long image on the left, labeled A, was the photo of the entire plant. The photo in the top right, labeled B, was the close up photo of the flower itself. The bottom right photo, labeled C, was the figure that shows the plant’s origin. For the labels A, B, and C, the letters were in the top left of the photo they were labeling, in a white box. The letters were in 72 font size and only occupied a small amount of space. 

 

Methods Paragraph 2

Submitted by rmirley on Wed, 02/21/2018 - 21:16

Next, a figure was created to show the origin of the species and where it mostly grows. The figure was created on amcharts.com under the visited countries section. The Blc Momilani Rainbow is found mostly in tropical climates in South America. As such, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panamá, Colombia, Ecuador, Perú, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Brazil were highlighted on the map. 

 

Chloroplast Physiology

Submitted by rmirley on Wed, 02/21/2018 - 21:12

The chloroplast is composed of several different parts. First, it has an outer membrane called the outer chloroplast membrane. This is then followed closely by an inner chloroplast membrane. Inside the membranes there are stacks of folded thylakoid membrane, called grana. between these folds is an interior called the lumen. Not all of the grana line up, leaving exposed sections called stromal lamellae. All of this is suspended in a fluid enterior in the chloroplast, called the stroma. 

Methods Paragraph 1

Submitted by rmirley on Wed, 02/21/2018 - 21:02

The plant that was photographed was the Blc Momilani Rainbow, otherwise known as “The Gypsy”. The plant was photographed in the Vine House of the Durfee Conservatory. The conservatory was entered from the rear entrance (opposite the street). The plant was located near the middle of the left wall of the second room. The plant was photographed from a distance a few feet away so the entire plant could be captured, as well as an up close shot that captured only the flower itself. 

Differences for Image 3

Submitted by rmirley on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 14:25

Differences for Image 3

Observations:

  1. Figure “A” is smaller in the original.
  2. Figure “B” captures most of the tree in the original, while only a few branches in the replicate.
  3. There is one blue angles arrow in figure “B” of the original, while there there are two white arrow heads in the replicate.
  4. There is a blue arrow pointing to the left branch on figure “C”, while there is a white arrow head pointing to the right branch in the replicate.
  5. The letters in the original are very small, while the letters in the replicate are fairly large.
  6. The picture in the original were taken on a sunny day, while the pictures of the replicate were taken on a cloudy overcast day.
  7. There are white bars between the photos in the original, while the photos in the replicate are connected.

 

Inferences:

  1. The original did not specify the size of the left most figure, figure “A”.
  2. The original did not specify the angle of the picture for figure “B”.
  3. The original did not specify the types of arrows used or how many.
  4. The original did not specify the types of arrows used or how many.
  5. The original did not specify the font size for the letters.
  6. The original did not specify the time of day or weather during the photographing.
  7. The original did not specify whether the figures were supposed to be aligned or spaced apart.

Differences for Image 3

Submitted by rmirley on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 14:25

Differences for Image 3

Observations:

  1. Figure “A” is smaller in the original.
  2. Figure “B” captures most of the tree in the original, while only a few branches in the replicate.
  3. There is one blue angles arrow in figure “B” of the original, while there there are two white arrow heads in the replicate.
  4. There is a blue arrow pointing to the left branch on figure “C”, while there is a white arrow head pointing to the right branch in the replicate.
  5. The letters in the original are very small, while the letters in the replicate are fairly large.
  6. The picture in the original were taken on a sunny day, while the pictures of the replicate were taken on a cloudy overcast day.
  7. There are white bars between the photos in the original, while the photos in the replicate are connected.

 

Inferences:

  1. The original did not specify the size of the left most figure, figure “A”.
  2. The original did not specify the angle of the picture for figure “B”.
  3. The original did not specify the types of arrows used or how many.
  4. The original did not specify the types of arrows used or how many.
  5. The original did not specify the font size for the letters.
  6. The original did not specify the time of day or weather during the photographing.
  7. The original did not specify whether the figures were supposed to be aligned or spaced apart.

Observation vs Inference

Submitted by rmirley on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 13:46

To me, an observation is something that you see. An inference is a hypothesis you make based off of the observation. For example. If I am handed a glass of water that has ice in it, I observe that there is ice in the cup. Because of my observation of the ice, I infer that the drink is cold, despite the fact that I have not physically touched the drink itself.

Nutrient Extraction

Submitted by rmirley on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 20:50

Plants extract nutrients from the soil in order to survive. Not all nutrients are alike however. Some nutrients are water soluble, while others are not. Some nutrients are charged and thus difficult to move around in the soil. These factors can make it difficult for the plant to get these nutrients from the soil. Luckily the plant has deceloped ways in order to extrac to these pesky nutrients from the soil. One major way plants extract difficult nutrients from the soil is by guided root proliferation. The roots simply grow towards nutrients once the zone they occupy has been depleted. Another way that plants can extract nutrients from the soil is by excreting H+ ions into the soil. These H+ ions help to break down the nutrients and make them more soluble/easier to move. These methods have greatly helped in the plant's survival by gather all necessary nutrients. 

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