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Persepolis introduction

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 04/06/2018 - 14:19

Persepolis is a graphic novel about a little girl growing up in a time of conflict for Iran. Despite the cartoonish appearence and art style, inocent people are imprisoned and executed just for speaking their mind. In an effort to spare the little girl suffering, her parents send her to grow up in vienna where she was simultaneously saved and alieneted. As she gets older she learns about how Iranians are viewed, romantic relationships, and her own idealistic beliefs.

Leaf cell development

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 03/23/2018 - 13:15

Michelle Facette received her Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University in 2008 and now works in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico. I attended her  guest lecture on the fifteenth of February and she summarized some of her work with stomata, cell differentiation, and other developmental aspects of Maize in a concise and understandable way. While she has helped author many papers I believe the majority of the concepts discussed at this job talk came from a few papers that cite her as an author published in 2012, 2013, and 2015. These papers titled: Division Polarity in Developing Stomata, Parallel Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analyses of successive Stages of Maize Leaf Development, and The SCAR/WAVE complex polarizes PAN receptors and promotes division asymmetry in maize, all use maize as a model organism to look at intracellular and intercellular chemical cues,  as well as other aspects of leaf development.

 

Michelle Facette Papers

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 03/23/2018 - 13:15

Michelle Facette received her Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University in 2008 and now works in the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico. I attended her  guest lecture on the fifteenth of February and she summarized some of her work with stomata, cell differentiation, and other developmental aspects of Maize in a concise and understandable way. While she has helped author many papers I believe the majority of the concepts discussed at this job talk came from a few papers that cite her as an author published in 2012, 2013, and 2015. These papers titled: Division Polarity in Developing Stomata, Parallel Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analyses of successive Stages of Maize Leaf Development, and The SCAR/WAVE complex polarizes PAN receptors and promotes division asymmetry in maize, all use maize as a model organism to look at intracellular and intercellular chemical cues,  as well as other aspects of leaf development.

In class Data analysis Group 5

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 03/09/2018 - 14:22

Matthew Parkllan, Liam Gorman, Austin Meserole

One way that these data can be interpreted is by creating two different graphs, one with GPA and Hours studied as the x and y axis, and have another graph with hours studied vs hours slept as the x and y axis. If we wanted to be really thourough we could make these two graphs each for both male and female students. Sorting the data out this way would be a good way to prove or disprove the hypothesis that more hours of sleep leads to a higher GPA.

Statistics class

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 03/09/2018 - 13:20

I remember a few things about my semester of intro to stats. In general we learned about certain types of analysis of data. Some key terms that pop into my mind are things like mean, average, p-value, standard deviations, and equations to relate all of the values. I also remember the tests including all of these things as well as another layer of complexity, as they would give us limited information and ask us to produce a conclusion about how likely a certain outcome is. I few other students lived on my floor so studying outside of lecture could clear up any misunderstandings I still had and I did pretty well in the class. Another thing that I remember was that our teacher wanted us to be able to apply our new skills to the real world and realize that certain interpretations of data can be misleading, like when certain claims are made on tv. The difference between correlation and causation was also discussed in a particularly funny class day, when she showed us a bunch of bogus statistics like levels of crime and levels of cheese consumption being correlated across states, meaning of course that cheese causes crime. This is most of what i remember from intro to statistics.

Cichlid study

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 03/09/2018 - 13:18

Species of African Cichlid fishes and their evolutionary development are the main focus of Albertson’s lab and understanding how environmental factors like types of food sources and availability can influence traits like jaws to fill different niches across different bodies of water. Craig Albertson’s lab studies aspects of evolutionary development to better understand how genotypes become morphologies. His lab follows species from embryo to maturity, documenting everything along the way. In the past Albertson’s lab has studied many aspects of species like Zebrafish and Cichlids and how their populations in various lakes and bodies of water developed such diverse characteristics. His lab includes many members at various levels of education from undergraduates to postdoctoral researchers has published papers on many topics in the field of evolutionary development, genetic and phenotypic expression, evolutionary mutant models for human disease, and morphological features of Cichlids. Studying how all of these factors come together to create large populations is vital to understanding both the origins of these species and how well they can adapt to change helps us understand how their roles in the ecosystem developed and how they will continue to change because of human interference.

Manuscript guideline observations

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 02/23/2018 - 11:24

In order to become an author with this journal there are a few guidelines that must be followed. The first requirement is to register through their website and confirm said registration by email. The next step is to become acquainted with their “instructions for authors page” which includes a few different links. These links have information about things like conflicts of interest, and other norms associated with papers published in this journal.

In the “additional information for authors page” they specify that the title should include what drug was investigated, what type of people the drug was tested on, and the general design of the experiment.  

    The document also includes specifications, headings, key points, and acknowledgements. To aid new authors, examples of each section are also provided to increase the clarity of the guidelines.

 

Observations on Figures 14

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 15:56

Their are a few similarities and differences between these two figures on page 14. Both figures include two birds eye view pictures and one on the ground of roughly the same location, but the exact locations, zoom levels, and times of day appear to be the most obvious differences. The first figure's ground level picture is on a cloudy day and you can see the church, the library, and 3 fountains of the campus pond while the second figure's ground level picture is on a bright sunny day and only includes two fountains, the church and the library. Out of the two birds eye pictures of each figure, one shows a more developed metawampe lawn with grass and concrete ramps while the other picture of each figure has what seems to be just pathes of dirt in certain areas. Another similarity between the two birds eye pictures that i noticed is that th foliage around the campus pond between the two figures almost make the campus pond look like a different shape, like trees were added and they hide the real waterfront of the campus pond. Another difference between the two birds eye shots in each figure is that the one with more dirt patches also seems to include small buildings that are replaced with grass in the other shot.

One inference that I think can be made is that the two birds eye shots of each figure are to compare the before and after. Today the metawampe lawn and the other grass areas looks like they do right now while the other resembles what I would guess the areas looked like before development.

 

Observations VS Inferences In-class

Submitted by mparkllan on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 13:58

It can sometimes be difficult to distinguish observations from inferences and other times they couldn't be farther apart. I can observe the fact that a person on the freeway might be driving a bright red Camero but I cannot infer that they usually drive over the speed limit unless I observe something else that could lead me to that conclusion. In these situations, the observation is more like a concrete fact or an accurate description while an inference is always a guess at what that observation could mean as it relates to previous observations.

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