You are here

crmckenzie's blog

Invented Mammal P5 PP

Submitted by crmckenzie on Sun, 04/22/2018 - 14:53

McKenzie explains that "their fur is slick as they love being in the water, and they swim to cool off.” She informed us that they are believed to mate at all times of the year, but mostly near the end of the wet season, as their gestation period is about four months long and the females prefer to raise their young in the thick of the dry season where anacondas are less likely to strike, as anacondas mate and burrow in the mud during the dry season (Largest Snake). The Snanker is quite territorial, as a dominant male claims his own stretch of bank and selects a few females, then uses a special gland to mark his territory. The Snanker is thought to reach sexual maturity at around the age of four, and the dominant male chases young males off of his territory once they reach the age of two.

 

Practice CV P2

Submitted by crmckenzie on Sun, 04/22/2018 - 14:50

My educational background has thoroughly prepared me for a Physician Assistant program. Currently, I am completing a comprehensive Undergraduate Program in Biology and English at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. In particular, my studies of upper level human physiology and neurology have prepared me immensely for PA school's more intensive curriculum. I hope that the skills I acquire from this graduate degree will supply me with the opportunity to work in the medical field as a Physician's Assistant and I am eager to contribute my enthusiasm and passion about medicine to the medical world. I am certain that my resume, which I have enclosed, will give you a greater understanding of my qualifications for this program. My experience as an Emergency Medical Technician has also provided me with critical and invaluable experience about the medical field and has made me certain that PA school is the path for me.

Practice CV

Submitted by crmckenzie on Sat, 04/21/2018 - 20:19

I am very interested in pursuing a Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies at Northeastern University. After review of several different PA school programs and discussions with medical professionals, I have come to the conclusion that Northeastern University has a top tier Physician Assistant program due to its duration and options available within the program. It is ranked 20th in the nation and has been running since 1971, making it one of the most experienced programs in the nation. The small class size is also very important to my me. I am also interested in the dual degree and certificate programs Northeastern offers, specifically, the PA/MPH pathway as I am very interested in public health.

Orgo Lab Discussion

Submitted by crmckenzie on Fri, 04/20/2018 - 13:24

    Esters are known for their distinctive odors and are commonly used for food aromas and different fragrances. They are made by the food industry to mimic natural flavors of fruits and flowers which in turn lower product costs. The original combination of the reactants produced a strong, unpleasant smell likened to that of alcohol and body odor combined. The final product smelled like artificial banana flavoring. Other smells in the room included pineapple and cherry.

 

Invented Mammal P7

Submitted by crmckenzie on Thu, 04/19/2018 - 22:06

The name Snanker is a playful combination of the words snake and bank that McKenzie came up with during her trip and that the scientists decided to keep. After closer investigation, evolutionist Dr. Devon Elop, Dev for short, has come to the conclusion that the Magnacide dynaphyll is a close relative of Panthera onca, or the jaguar (Sartore). “Both species are well adapted for swimming and aquatic environments, but the Snanker is even more so.” While both the jaguar and the Snanker can become prey to the anaconda, the Snanker is far more equipped in dealing with the snake. The Snanker almost solely hunts anacondas and is extremely specialized in doing so. The anaconda is its only predator and due to the fact that they are larger and swifter than jaguars, they are thought to be on the way to overpopulating the species. “I’m extremely proud of this discovery,” McKenzie gloats. “I cannot wait to see what the world has to say about the Snanker”.

Invented Mammal P6

Submitted by crmckenzie on Wed, 04/18/2018 - 15:14

Their life span averages at twenty years. They do not hibernate and their pituitary glands are not terribly overworked, as conserving water is not a main concern in the tropical rainforest (Pituitary). Like most carnivores, their digestive tract is relatively short, and they are equipped with many enzymes to digest meat. Scientists decided to name this species Magnacide dynaphyll by using various Latin roots. The generic name, Magnacide, is a mix of magna and cide, meaning big sharp tooth. The specific name, dynaphyll, is a mix of dyn, a-, and phyll, meaning powerful, green, and on the shore.

Invented Mammal P5

Submitted by crmckenzie on Tue, 04/17/2018 - 14:00

Their fur is slick as they love being in the water, and they swim to cool off.” She explained that they are believed to mate at all times of the year, but mostly near the end of the wet season, as their gestation period is about four months and the females prefer to raise their young in the thick of the dry season where anacondas are less likely to strike, for anacondas mate and burrow in the mud during the dry season (Largest Snake). A dominant male claims his own stretch of bank and selected females and uses a special gland to mark his territory. The Snanker are thought to reach sexual maturity at around the age of four, and the dominant male chases young males off of his territory once they reach the age of two.

Invented Mammal P4 PP

Submitted by crmckenzie on Sun, 04/15/2018 - 16:31

The Snanker was unlike anything she had seen before. ”It looked like a cat crossed with an otter crossed with a mongoose,” she says. “It used its long claws to tear into the snake and the mud around it, and later I observed it digging into the mud for snakes that were hiding.” McKenzie describes the Snanker as having short rounded ears that become flat to the head when the animal swims, a long muzzle with razor sharp teeth and large canines for puncturing its prey, long muscular legs, and webbed paws useful for swimming and walking in the mud. “They are mainly active during the day, and because of this their eyes are not as large as, say, the ocelot’s,” McKenzie describes. After more observation, McKenzie was able to discover more about the seasonal changes and the mating process characteristic of the species. “As the dry season continued on, the green color on their pelts became less and less and faded into brown. I suspect that during the wet season, when they are mostly covered by vegetation, this makes them camouflage more easily into their surroundings." These characteristics were recognized by leading scientists in the field and are now being studied by evolutionary biologists. 

 

Invented Mammal P4

Submitted by crmckenzie on Sun, 04/15/2018 - 16:26

”It looked like a cat crossed with an otter crossed with a mongoose,” she says. “It used its long claws to tear into the snake and the mud around it, and later I observed it digging into the mud for snakes that were hiding.” McKenzie describes the Snanker as having short rounded ears that become flat to the head when the animal swims, a long muzzle with razor sharp teeth and large canines for puncturing its prey, long muscular legs, and webbed paws useful for swimming and walking in the mud. “They are mainly active during the day, and because of this their eyes are not as large as, say, the ocelot’s,” McKenzie says. After more observation, McKenzie was able to discover more about the seasonal changes and the mating process characteristic of the species. “As the dry season continued on, the green color on their pelts became less and less and faded into brown. I suspect that during the wet season, when they are mostly covered by vegetation, this makes them camouflage more easily into their surroundings.

Invented Mammal P3

Submitted by crmckenzie on Sat, 04/14/2018 - 13:30

It was in early June that it happened. McKenzie was sitting in vegetation by the shore of the water, observing the giant water lilies, when she realized that an anaconda was becoming dangerously close. “I panicked,” McKenzie recalls. “I had no idea what to do. I was frozen. But then, all of a sudden, a brownish-green blur flashed before my eyes. It didn’t even care that I was there,” she exclaimed. “The Snanker just jumped right in front of me and killed the anaconda immediately, swiftly dodging its head and biting it in the throat." But this creature was unlike anything she had ever seen before. As the animal devoured the giant snake, McKenzie was finally able to take in the details. It was huge, about seven feet long from nose to the tip of its tail, which was thick and muscular.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - crmckenzie's blog