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Results Section Draft 1

Submitted by benjaminburk on Fri, 02/23/2018 - 19:04

Observational differences are present throughout the figures is, even to the untrained eye. First off the flower pictured in the replicate, Figure 2, has a hint of white on it. Meanwhile in the original, Figure 1, the pictured flower does not have a hint of white on it. Another difference is that the flower pictured in panel B of Figure 2 is appears larger, than the flower pictured in panel A of Figure 1. Also the flower pictured in panel A of Figure 2 appears larger, than the flower pictured in panel B of Figure 1. The shading color of the map in panel C of Figure 2 is red, which is different than the blue color used in panel C of Figure 1. More of China is also shaded in panel C of Figure 2 than in panel C of Figure 1. Another difference is that the panel labels, A, B and C, in Figure 2 are white with a black background, however in Figure 1 they are black with no background. Lastly in panels A and B of Figure 1 there are arrows indicating location of important structures on the plant and flower, meanwhile in Figure 2 these arrows are absent.

Protein Complexes

Submitted by benjaminburk on Thu, 02/22/2018 - 18:50

In larger protein complexes proteins are bound together encoded into precise binding interfaces. Specificity and affinity are the foundational aspects that make these binding interfaces possible. However there are stills problems that can arise within the system. Large disordered proteins are to still capable of binding to various sites along well-structures polypetides. The reasoning behind this anomoly is because of the large opposite net charge of the two proteins. Sequencing nalysis of multiple structures shows that this interaction occurs abbundantly throughout nature.

Observations and Inerences of Methods Figures

Submitted by benjaminburk on Wed, 02/21/2018 - 16:36

Observations:

  • The flower has a hint of white on it
  • The flowers look bigger in both pictures
  • His figure A is the close up and Figure B is the wide shot
  • He used red instead of blue to color in the map
  • More of china is shaded in on his than on mine
  • The text color is white instead of black
  • The text also has a black background
  • No arrows

 

​Inferences:

  • ​The picture was taken from a closer position or with more zoom
  • The picture is of a different plant because my picture did not have any white in it or mine was taken at a later date farther into the blooming process
  • There was a lack of explanation on my part on how to construct the figure

Mechanism of Neurological Degradation

Submitted by benjaminburk on Tue, 02/20/2018 - 14:33

It is a pretty well known fact that as humans age the cognitive function of their brain degrades, as well. Certain disorders, diseases and other health aspects such as drug abuse or traumatic injuries can cause an increase in the degradation. However the mechanisms responsible for the normal degradation, outside of the injuries, drug abuse or disorders, is still relatively unknown. But a new research has shown that the decline in function may be a result of astrocyte dysfunction. Astrocytes help with the formation and elimination of synapses in the brain. In the study, done on mice, it was that the aging resulted in increased reactivity of astrocytese. This up-regulation of reactivity causes the astrocytes to lose their ability to carry out their normal functions and release toxins that destroy neurons. This loss of function change in the astrocytes results in cognitive degradtion and an increased possibility of traumatic brain injuries in aging brains. 

Protein Gylcosylation treatment for cancer

Submitted by benjaminburk on Mon, 02/19/2018 - 18:04

Glycosylation is the covalent addition of sugar groups to specific amino acids on petide bond chains. This process of sugar addition has lasting effects on the proteins location, shape, function and stability. In recent studies researchers have found that the glycosylation of immune receptors results in increased activity of both programmed cell death factors and anti-tumor factors as well. This specific study focused on the effects of the glycosylation on Triple-Negative breast cancer cells. The study also showed that the glycosylation process can also have inheritant effects on neighboring cell. This exciting revelation means that pairing immune checkpoint therapy with protein glycosylation could prove to be a very effective beneficial treatment for cancer, specifically Triple-Negative breast cancer.

Methods- Perfect Paragraph

Submitted by benjaminburk on Sun, 02/18/2018 - 13:04

he organism I decided to picture was found in the Durfee Conservatory, which is located between University Health Services and Morrill II. The exact address is 210 Stockbridge Road and it is open to the public 10am to 4pm, Monday through Friday. I went to conservatory at approximately 11am on a Friday. The entrance I used was the one closest to Morrill II, with a wooden sign outside of it that reads "Durfee Conservatory Visitors Welcome". Once inside the organism was found directly to the left of the entrance in a square pot. The name of the plant is Camellia Japonica Jarvis Red, it had a structure that was very similar to a small tree with green leaves and a few blossoming pink flowers. Once I found the plant and identified the name I returned to the door and placed my left hip on the shelves grounded to the wall and took a picture at eye level or approximately five and a half feet off the ground. Using my Iphone camera, I was sure to capture the full pant while specifically focusing on capturing the two blooming flowers in the picture as well. Then I squared my shoulders to the side of the plant facing Morrill II, so now my back was to the entrance wall. I then located the lower of the two flowers on this face of the plant, cleared away the branches in order to see the flower head on and took the second picture, once again using my Iphone camera. I was sure that the flower took up the majority of the screen and that individual structures of the flowers were identifiable. Once all the pictures were gathered the figure was created and it soncsisted of three panels, labeled A, B and C respectively.

 

Observations vs Inferences Write up

Submitted by benjaminburk on Sat, 02/17/2018 - 19:14

Observations are quantitative or qualitative characteristics that the observer notices about something. Meanwhile inferences are assumptions the observer makes based on the observations they made. In the activity we are using in class observations would be the concrete differences between the original and replicate figures. The inferences would be the reasons why the differences occured. For example if the lighting is different between the figures, one could infer that the figures were created at different times of day. In general the inferences and differences will be as a result of the lack of control of certain variables when creating the figure. 

Observation and inferences Practice with Pics

Submitted by benjaminburk on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 14:10

There were many differences throghout the figures. There is a distinguishable difference in the ligthing of the pictures, causing one to assume that they were taken at different times of the day. The original pictures are more blurry than the replicates, so there coulda been a different camera or lenses used. Also in panel C the plant is oriented differently in the replicate than in the original, leading one to infer that there was a discrepancy in the narrative portion of the methods. Overall these 3 differences show a lack of control in time, equipment and plant positioning.
 

Methods Draft #1

Submitted by benjaminburk on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 11:38

The organism to be pictured resides in the Durfee Conservatory, chich is located between University Health Services and Morill II. The exact address is 210 Stockbridge Road and it is open to the public 10am to 4pm, Monday through Friday. The entranced used was the one closest to Morill II and it had a wooden sign outside of it that read "Durfee Conservatory Visitors Welcome". Once inside the organism to be pictured is directly to the left in a square pot. The name of the plant is Camellia Japonica Jarvis Red, once the plant is located return to the door and place your left hip on the shelves grounded to the wall then take a picture at eye level or approximately five and a half feet of the ground, being sure to capture the as much of the plant as possible and being sure that the two blooming flowers are visible. Then square your shoulders to the side of the plant facing Morill II and locate the lower of the two flowers on the plant. Clear away the branches in order to see the flower head on and take your second picture. Make sure that the flower takes up the majority of the screen and that individual structures of the flowers can be identifiable. 

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