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Figures 24

Submitted by mrmoy on Fri, 02/16/2018 - 14:15

One difference is that figure 1 is a close-up of the pine cone. While in figure 2 is further away from the camera. A potential factor causing this is the distance between the photographer and the pine cone.

In figure 1, the background is brighter, giving the picture more detail. In figure 2, however, the picture is dark, making it hard to make out the texture of the pine cone. Given the white background of the picture, in figure 1 the photographer must have used the flash feature on his camera or had a light aimed at the pine cone. While in figure 2 the photographer relied the regular lighting of the room.

Also the scale in figure 1 has no units, which makes it hard to quanitify the size of the pine cone. Figure 2 has a scale with centimeters as its unit, giving the reader a reference of size. The photographer in figure 2 could have used a ruler to measure his pine cone and the photographer in figure 1 did not use one.

In figure 1, the figures are in a horizontal orientation (side by side). In figure 2, the figures are in a vertical orientaion (top and bottom). The person who created the original figure did not specify the orientation of the figures.

Methods draft #3

Submitted by mrmoy on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 22:20

At the top of the panel are the two pictures of the plant taken from the greenhouse. The measurements taken are added to the picture by using a photo editor to draw a reference line with these measurements included. These lines are necessary to give the reader a perspective of the magnitude and size of the flower and plant. The origin map was made on an app called Inkscape and occupies the bottom half of the figure. The map is constructed by starting off with a blank world map, with the individual countries given. From there, the countries that were previously researched are colored in on the blank map. These three figures are put into a 1200 x 1200 pixel google slide, serving as the figure constraints. Each figure was labeled with a unique letter. The final multipanel figure consists of three figures, one picture of the entire plant, one close-up of a flower, and a origin map of the plant.

 

Methods draft

Submitted by mrmoy on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 22:20

At the top of the panel are the two pictures of the plant taken from the greenhouse. The measurements taken are added to the picture by using a photo editor to draw a reference line with these measurements included. These lines are necessary to give the reader a perspective of the magnitude and size of the flower and plant.

Methods Project

Submitted by mrmoy on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 22:19

The species of plant that is being observed is the Camellia Japonica Napoleon. This plant is located at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Durfee Conservatory & Garden. The greenhouse is in between the morrill science buildings and the university health center. Facing the morrill science buildings is an entrance to the greenhouse, where the different kinds of Camellia Japonica are found on the right immediately after entering the greenhouse. The Camellia Japonica Napoleon is the second to last tree from the entrance. Two pictures are taken: a close-up picture of an individual flower and a picture of the entire plant. The close-up of the individual flower includes a fully blossomed flower. The fully blossomed flower is pink in color and has multiple layers of petals. Measurements of the flower size is taken with a ruler in centimeters and is recorded for future reference. The picture of the entire plant is taken from a distance at a vertical angle in which the plant is in between the entrance and the camera. The size of the entire plant is estimated by standing next to the plant. Along with the two pictures obtained from the Durfee Conservatory & Garden, is a world map showing the origins of the Camellia Japonica Napoleon plant. This information is found by researching the origins of the Camellia Japonica family, rather than the specific individual Napoleon subspecies.

Methods draft #2

Submitted by mrmoy on Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:16

Two pictures are taken: a close-up picture of an individual flower and a picture of the entire plant. The close-up of the individual flower includes a fully blossomed flower. The fully blossomed flower is pink in color and has multiple layers of petals. Measurements of the flower size is taken with a ruler in centimeters and is recorded for future reference. The picture of the entire plant is taken from a distance at an angle in which the plant is in between the entrance and the camera. The size of the entire plant is estimated by standing next to the plant. Along with the two pictures obtained from the Durfee Conservatory & Garden, is a world map showing the origins of the Camellia Japonica Napoleon plant. This information is found by researching the origins of the Camellia Japonica family, rather than the specific individual Napoleon species. The countries where these plants grow in the wild is marked on the blank image of a world map.

Methods draft #1

Submitted by mrmoy on Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:15

The species of plant that is being observed is the Camellia Japonica Napoleon. This plant is located at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Durfee Conservatory & Garden. The greenhouse is in between the morrill science buildings and the university health center. Facing the morrill science buildings is an entrance to the greenhouse, where the different kinds of Camellia Japonica are found on the right immediately after entering the greenhouse. The Camellia Japonica Napoleon is the second to last tree from the entrance.

How Might Clearing the Forest Affect Nitrogen Cycling?

Submitted by mrmoy on Thu, 02/08/2018 - 16:08

The nitrogen cycle is an essential process of life as it is helps turn nitrogen into a form that is available to animals and plants. Nitrogen is a necessity of life as it is essential for growth and reproduction for both plants and animals. A key component of the nitrogen cycle is the presence of plants as they help turn inorganic forms of nitrogen, such as ammonia and nitric acid, into organic forms of nitrogen that can then be move up the food chain. Clearing the forest would kill all the plants and trees in that area, ultimately having a major effect on the nitrogen cycle. With no plants, the conversion of inorganic forms of nitrogen to organic forms of nitrogen cannot happen. Instead, bacteria in the soil breakdown the plant available nitrogen into gases in a process known as denitrification. Another negative effect is that plant available nitrogen is very soluble in water, thus if plants aren’t there to take up the nitrogen, then it will be leached away into our rivers, lakes, oceans, and other bodies of water. In conclusion, clearing forests could have some unforeseen devastating effects on the nitrogen cycle and more importantly the environment.

Nitrogen Cycle Importance

Submitted by mrmoy on Thu, 02/08/2018 - 16:00

The nitrogen cycle is an essential process of life as it is helps turn nitrogen into a form that is available to animals and plants

- Nitrogen is important component of many cells and processes such as proteins and DNA.

-A key component of the nitrogen cycle is the presence of plants as they help turn inorganic forms of nitrogen, such as ammonia and nitric acid, into organic forms of nitrogen that can then be move up the food chain

- The process includes: nitrogen fixation, nitrification, ammonification, and denitrification.

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