MLL Gynogenesis - PP

Submitted by mtracy on Sat, 11/10/2018 - 12:35

 

Some fish species reproduce through a method of parthenogenesis called gynogenesis, in which a female will produce an already fertilized and viable egg. This method may be observed in Poeciliopsis monocha and Poeciliopsis lucida. Normally there is a breeding population of diploid fish of each of these species. However, there is also a triploid population of female only monocha-lucida-lucida fish (MLL). These fish produce triploid MLL eggs. Oddly enough, even though there is no genetic transfer between egg and sperm, a diploid lucida sperm is still required in order to activate the MLL egg. Once activated, this egg will develop into a female MLL adult. The fish that comes from this egg is always a triploid female, a genetic clone of its mother and all the fish in its lineage before it.

Genetics paper PP

Submitted by yurigarcia on Sat, 11/10/2018 - 00:19

Nowadays there are genetic investigations that identifies any risk of diseases. By doing this, it allows for people to select a better medication and to be able to get a better personalized care. Gathering this genetic information, it facilitates doctors to choose a better medicine and the correct dose with less side effects for the patient. In many countries around the world the study of genetics in their population successfully identified the risk of developing hypertension. Another example is an indication of surgeries that reduces the risks after finding that a patient may have any mutation in the genes that may develop into breast cancer.

Currently it exists many genetic tests for the diagnosis of many diseases and with the help of new technology, it accelerates great findings to be able to catch diseases early and  hope for treatment. 

genetics paper draft

Submitted by yurigarcia on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 23:59

Nowadays there are genetic investigations that identifies any risk of diseases. By doing this, it allows for people to select a better medication and to be able to get a better personalized care. Gathering this genetic information, it facilitates doctors to choose a better medicine and the correct dose with less side effects for the patient. In many countries around the world the study of genetics in their population successfully identified the risk of developing hypertension. 

pp

Submitted by jkswanson on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 13:54

Putting up a finished project onto a poster board to present has been a part of science forever. Some things constitute a good poster while others bad, and some combination land most posters in between. A scientific poster can be viewed as good to different people for different reasons, like the opinion of the article or the subject matter being discussed. These are important but also some things across the board that make a good poster.  Such as, the title must sum up the experiment is an understandable way. The bear minimum requirement for the title should be that, but a good title will also intrigue the reader and almost trap them into wanting to read the rest. The title “ Using zebrafish larval models to study brain injury, locomotor and neuroinflammatory outcomes following intracerebral haemorrhage [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 1 approved with reservations]” is a basic title, just getting the point across, barely simplifying it. Compared to this title, “Are we aiming to miss in translational autoimmunity treatments?[version 1; referees: awaiting peer review]”, which involves the reader and tries to grab their interest with a question.  Another important aspect of a poster is the display of the data, if it is hard to see or make sense out of, the reader is more inclined to lose interest. Having the entire project be displayed in such a manner that someone who has no clue on the subject can generally figure it out is the aim. This means using words that are not unique to the field of study or if used explaining them in everyday terms. Another good key for quality posters is length, if the poster is too long it can scare readers away and if too short make them not see the point in the project. Many good things contribute to the quality of posters, these are just a few.

PP Week 9

Submitted by jnduggan on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 12:29

Our RESEARCH DESIGN was modeled after a paper that studied spider web production in terms of web mass and temperature. Fruit flies were dropped into the web with a relatively complex apparatus that was beyond the scope of our project, so our inverted cup and straw apparatus will serve as a practical substitute. The methods we will follow also closely resemble Barghusen’s paper. We will run the experiment over the course of five days because six days gave indicative results in one of the papers we studied (Barghusen et al). In that paper, a temperature gradient was created using Aluminum pans and a hot plate. Our experiment will create a similar temperature gradient using styrofoam boxes and a heat lamp for the warm condition and ice for the cold condition. The Barghusen paper found that web mass was significantly lighter in the colder conditions, so we expect similar results.

 

Draft Post Week 9

Submitted by jnduggan on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 12:27

Our RESEARCH DESIGN is modeled after a paper that studied spider web production in terms of web mass and temperatures. Fruit flies were dropped into the web with an relatively complex apparatus, beyond the scope of our project, so our inverted cup and straw apparatus will serve as a practical substitute. The methods we will follow also closely resemble Barghusen’s paper. We will run the experiment over the course of five days because six days gave indicative results in one of the papers we studied (Barghusen et al). A temperature gradient was created using Aluminum pans and a hot plate. Our experiment will create a similar gradient using styrofoam boxes and a heat lamp for the warm condition and ice for the cold condition. The Barghusen paper found that web mass was significantly lighter in the colder conditions, so we expect similar results.

 

Deflection of light by sun- Perfect Paragraph

Submitted by eehardy on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 12:23

Another famous experiment that supports General Relativity is the deflection of light by the sun. Previous theories of gravity held that light would not be affected by gravity since it has no mass. However, Einstein thought otherwise. His Equivalence Principle predicts that light will curve in the presence of a gravitational field. The principle states that the effects of a gravitational field are the same as the effects of those in an accelerated frame of reference. Gravity would cause a person in a gravitational field to accelerate with g, the acceleration due to gravity. However, if the person’s frame of reference were to be accelerated at g when they were not in a gravitational field, all of the effects on them would be “equivalent” to how they would be in a gravitational field. Thus, in essence, a gravitational field can be created. Now, if a person was in the accelerating frame of reference and was to shine a beam of light out into an inertial reference frame of space, it would appear as though the light is curving downward since the particles of light emitted earlier would be lower than those emitted as the acceleration proceeds higher. And since this accelerated reference frame is equivalent to a gravitational field, the same thing would apparently happen in a gravitational field; light would curve. But according to classical physics, the force due to gravity is mass times acceleration… so how would light be affected since it has zero mass? And the curvature of spacetime explains this problem perfectly since light doesn’t need mass to follow the curve of spacetime. Thus, according to Einstein, light is deflected by gravity.

Deflection of light by sun- draft

Submitted by eehardy on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 12:10

Another famous experiment that supports General Relativity is deflection of light by the sun. Previous theories of gravity held that light would not be affected by gravity since it has no mass. However, Einstein showed this idea to be incorrect. Taking a look at Einstein’s Equivalence Principle which relates to gravity, we can imagine this idea. Einstein’s equivalence principle states that the effects of a gravitational field are the same as the effects of those in an accelerated frame of reference. Gravity would cause a person in a gravitational field to accelerate with g, the acceleration due to gravity. However if the person’s frame of reference were to be accelerated at g when they were not in a gravitational field, all of the effects on them would be “equivalent” to how they would be in a gravitational field. Thus, in essence, a gravitational field can be created. Now if a person were in the accelerating frame of reference and were to shine a beam of light out into an inertial reference frame of space, it would appear that the light is curving downward, since the particles of light emitted earlier will be lower than those emitted as the acceleration proceeds higher. And since this accelerated reference frame is equivalent to a gravitational field, the same thing would apparently happen in a gravitational field; light would curve. But according to classical physics, the force due to gravity is mass times acceleration… so how would light be affected since it has zero mass? And the curvature of spacetime explains this problem perfectly, since light doesn’t need mass to follow the curve of spacetime. Thus, according to Einstein, light is deflected by gravity.

Addition to "background" of proposal

Submitted by eehardy on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 12:08

(1).Another study described spider webs as depending upon the mechanical performance of capture threads, and states that web function arises from the architecture and mechanical performance of silk (3.) This study also used microscopy, and measured the web thickness of different web types: orb webs, funnel webs, dome webs, and irregular mesh webs. The different types of webs yielded different thicknesses on average, with orb webs being the thickest. Since spider webs must be strong enough to withstand the weight of the spider on the web, and be durable enough to support the spider’s movement, it is plausible that spider weight could also be a factor in web thickness, in addition to web type.   

Trimyristin Closing

Submitted by bthoole on Fri, 11/09/2018 - 11:42

Overall, the percent yields were high and the melting points were close to the literature values, suggesting a good return on product and a relative purity in the samples. The first recrystallization experiment used a set amount of acetone, 1 ml for every 50mg of crude product from the isolation. As a result, the percent yield was the lowest of the experiment. If the experiment were to go about obtaining the purest samples, this stage of the experiment should have been conducted by using the minimum amount of acetone necessary to dissolve the product. This would have given a higher percent yield and may also have given a better purity and thereby a closer match for melting point. In the end, the identity and purity of the products were assessed for what they were, and the product after both recrystallization steps was identified as trimyristin and the product after the hydrolysis and acid addition was identified as myristic acid.

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