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Results of Methods - PP

Submitted by afeltrin on Thu, 02/21/2019 - 19:18

The size of the letters in the upper left hand text boxes vary when looking at Figure 1 to Figure 2. The same sans-serif font appears to be used; yet, in the original figure, the letter size is larger than in the replicated figure. There is an obvious difference in photos ‘b’ as, in the original figure, the quarter is being held up to the finger. In the replicated figure, the quarter is placed on a flat surface with the finger placed to the left of it. Another difference is the actual images taken of the leaf. In Figure 1, in photos ‘c’ and ‘d,’ the leaf is not as closely seen as in Figure 2.

Results

Submitted by afeltrin on Thu, 02/21/2019 - 18:21

The size of the letters in the upper left hand textboxes varies when looking at Figure 1 to Figure 2. The same sans-serif font appears to be used, while in the original figure, the letter size is larger than in the replicated figure. There is an obvious difference in photos ‘b’ as, in the original figure, the quarter is being held up to the finger. In the replicated figure, the quarter is placed on a flat surface with the finger placed to the left of it. Another difference is the actual images taken of the leaf. In Figure 1, in photos ‘c’ and ‘d,’ the leaf is not as closely seen as in Figure 2.

Gender-Science IAT

Submitted by afeltrin on Thu, 02/21/2019 - 17:07

I decided to take the Gender-Science Implicit Association Test for the second test. I figured it would be really interesting because I am a female and attaining a science major. My results stated I have little or no automatic association between Female and Male with Science and Liberal Arts. Of the people that have taken this test, around 70% have an automatic association of male with science and female with liberal arts. My results do not really surprise me at all. Additionally, the results from other people that have taken this test do not surprise me, either. Most people seem to automatically associate men with science-related professions, as opposed to women.

A Critical View of Criminal Profiling

Submitted by afeltrin on Thu, 02/21/2019 - 14:52

In Gladwell's "Dangerous Minds," he is extremely skeptical of the usefulness and accuracy of criminal profiling. An argument he makes relates criminal profilers to psychics because Douglas is called a psychic from a police officer, and Douglas is amused at the assumption. An argument Gladwell makes is when he tells that Brussel's profile wasn't even correct the first times he made it and that he never even said the Mad Bomber of New York was of Slavic descent; he claimed he was from Germany. Gladwell also goes on to tell us about each of the three profiles made by different professionals of the BTK killer; the profiles are extremely vague and each contradict each other. So Gladwell leaves us to wonder why we should rely on criminal profiling if there's no certainty or apparent validity to it.

Communication Differences Relating to Gender

Submitted by afeltrin on Wed, 02/20/2019 - 20:20

In relation to language ideologies, I think these ideologies definitely mediate social structures and individual speech acts. Upbringing and the biases we develop play a role in how we talk, as in words we use, or slang, or language based on who we are talking to. I feel like effective communication really only 100% works with people of the same gender speaking. Girls typically hold the same beliefs regarding socialization—that sticking to pairs or small groups is preferred and that friendships are built upon secrets shared. Boys do more movement-related things as opposed to really talking. But, when they do talk, they talk about common interests like sports or games. Men don’t really talk through issues with each other, but they still overcome them. Women talk it out at length and overcome problems together. When you look at men and women communicating, it’s more of a challenge. For a relationship to work well in a woman’s perspective, conversation should always be happening and they should be talking things out. For men, a relationship is working out when they don’t have to keep talking things over.

Regional Species Richness

Submitted by afeltrin on Wed, 02/20/2019 - 18:37

I do not think the regional species richness on the mainland will affect how many species are predicted to be found on an island based on the equilibrium theory of island biogeography. The theory focuses on predicting the amount of species present for, as an example, a large island close or far to the mainland; it focuses on the relationship between species and a particular area. Regional species richness relates to the amount of species found in a region, combining all the residing communities in that region. Regional species richness does not take extinction or immigration rates into account, like the equilibrium theory does.

Emic vs. Etic Descriptions of Cultures

Submitted by afeltrin on Wed, 02/20/2019 - 17:34

As perspective moves from emic to etic descriptions, these human universals inevitably change. When an emic description of a ritual is presented, our perspective is accepting and understanding. They are easier to connect with, being that they’re from the same culture. But, with an etic description, one of another culture may view the ritual as “primitive” because of the superiority some groups believe they hold. Our long-held customs are challenged as we listen to someone from a different culture trying to explain our customs using their own language and concepts. It can sometimes distort the views of out customs and what we’ve believed in for so long and repeated day after day.

Observations and Inferences #12

Submitted by afeltrin on Fri, 02/15/2019 - 14:51

A glaring difference between the original figure and replicated figure is the placement, font, and size of the panel letters. On the left side, the letters are small, in a sans-serif font, and in the bottom lefthand corner. On the right side figure, the letters are in the upper lefthand corner, are in a serif font, and are almost three times the size of the other panel letters. The set up is the same, though; the three photos descend from ‘A’ at the top to ‘C' at the bottom.
 
The photos of ‘A' are similar, yet the one on the left is very zoomed in, as opposed to the picture on the right. At least arrows are utilized on the right figure to point to the object being aimed at. Similarly, in photo ‘B,’ on the left, the image is far more zoomed in when compared to the right. Finally, in photo ‘C,’ this time the photo on the left is more zoomed out than the photo on the right. Images ‘A’ and ‘B’ appear to be of the same location, just taken at different years as according to the date shown at the bottom of each picture taken from Google Earth. Then, the final pictures included are taken in between the flagpoles, I assume due to the arrow pointing to the flagpoles in the previous pictures on the right panel. I assume the last picture was personally taken by the people conducting and following the methods as the picture clarity is not really provided via Google Earth for such a focused area.

Using Inkscape - PP

Submitted by afeltrin on Wed, 02/13/2019 - 11:46

After taking and downloading the four photos onto my computer, I created a folder titled “Inkscape Methods.” I moved the four photos into that folder. I downloaded Inkscape and opened the application. I saved the project into the folder I created and titled the project as “Feltrin-original.” I imported the four photos at the same time. I locked the image properties at the top toolbar, resized each image, and cropped each image. I made sure each image was equally sized and comparable, paying careful attention and ensuring the two images involving my finger stroking along the stem of the leaf displayed the leaf at the same size. I set each photo’s width to 246mm. I aligned the four pictures so the photo of the quarter next to the leaf was in the upper left quadrant, the photo of the quarter next to my finger was in the upper right quadrant, the photo of my finger first touching the end of the plant closest to the main stem was in the lower left quadrant, and the photo of my finger touching the tip of the plant was in the lower right quadrant.

Using Inkscape

Submitted by afeltrin on Wed, 02/13/2019 - 10:53

After taking and downloading the four photos onto my computer, I created a folder titled “Inkscape Methods.” I moved the photos into that folder. I downloaded Inkscape and opened the application. I saved the project into the folder I created and titled the project as “Feltrin-original.” I imported the four photos at the same time. I locked the image properties, resized each image, and cropped each image. I made sure each image was equally sized, paying careful attention and ensuring the two images involving my finger stroking along the stem of the leaf displayed the leaf at the same size. I set each photo’s width to 246mm. I aligned the four pictures so the photo of the quarter next to the leaf was in the upper left quadrant, the photo of the quarter next to my finger was in the upper right quadrant, the photo of my finger first touching the end of the plant closest to the main stem was in the lower left quadrant, and the photo of my finger touching the tip of the plant was in the lower right quadrant.

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