Different Figure Descriptions

Submitted by asalamon on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 14:01

Figure 1. Drosera rotundifolia.  Drosera rotundifolia has tendril-like extensions which collect dew. "Drosera rotundifolia." flickr photo by Free the Image https://flickr.com/photos/freetheimage/14129398634 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Figure 2. Water Properties.  Surface tension is one of the properties of water as seen on the Drosera rotundifolia which keeps the water in spheres on the tips of the red tendrils. "Drosera rotundifolia." flickr photo by Free the Image https://flickr.com/photos/freetheimage/14129398634 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

My leaf PP

Submitted by kheredia on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 13:14

The leaf I chose to represent phytophagy on campus displayed more characteristics for evidence than others I examined. The exact location of this leaf was 1 foot away from a nearby tree across from Recreational center. I was intentionally searching for fallen leaves, as I predicted they would be easier for insects to eat without having to expend much energy climbing a tree.

The leaf exhibits a dark green color. I predicted the leaf had recently fallen, due to its stiff texture. On the leaf there are various sized holes. The smallest was only some millimeters long while the largest had been approximately 2/10ths of a centimeter. Around the holes are small bumps which are discolored. They are lighter in color than the lear’s entirety, with hints of brown. This does not look like a typical display of leaf decay, so it is highly likely that those areas are where phytophagy occurred. I kept the sample with me in the case it is needed in the future.

Blood Cancer Journal

Submitted by nkantorovich on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 13:00

 

Plasma cell dyscrasias is discussed in this article through the analysis of multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells but of a certain type. When plasma cells begin to grow abnormally, they make a certain type of antibody and form a monoclonal paraprotein. They can be detected in the bone marrow and other tissues. The premalignant stage of multiple myeloma is characterized by the presence of the abnormal antibody, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). This antibody is present in 3-4% of normal individuals over the age of 50 years old and is only an issue if it progresses to multiple myeloma. The risk of MGUS progression to multiple myeloma increases by 10% in the first 5 years after diagnosis MGUS could also develop into a different plasma cell disorder as it is still an abnormal protein. This development could lead to disorders such as plasma cell leukemia or Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. 

 
Jelinek, T, et al. “Current Applications of Multiparameter Flow Cytometry in Plasma Cell Disorders.” Nature News, Nature Publishing Group, 20 Oct. 2017, www.nature.com/articles/bcj201790.
 

Blood Cancer Journal Reflection 2

Submitted by nkantorovich on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 12:58

Multiparameter flow cytometry has become a standard in diagnosis and prognosis of patients with plasma cell disorders. New technology created a (NFG) or next-generation flow cytometry that measured characteristics of cells to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) in a cost effective way. This method could also be used to detect circulating tumor cells and recent cases has shown its success in detecting multiple myelomas. Paraproteins are a type of protein detected in the bone marrow and other tissues when cancer or other diseases are present. Specifically, when plasma cells begin to make an abnormal protein (monoclonal) this is a sign of myeloma.

 
 

Jelinek, T, et al. “Current Applications of Multiparameter Flow Cytometry in Plasma Cell Disorders.” Nature News, Nature Publishing Group, 20 Oct. 2017, www.nature.com/articles/bcj201790.

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