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My research on spiders

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 11:48

Spiders are among the world’s largest and most diverse animal lineages. They have diverse behaviors. For example, some families build webs for prey capture whereas others are active hunters that stalk their prey using vision.  These behaviors correlate with differences in their visual systems. The number, complexity and arrangement of spider eyes vary across spider families. Spiders thus provide an opportunity to undertake comparative studies. In particular, very little is known about the neurobiology of spider brains. Spider brains are very different than those of insects and even other chelicerates, such as scorpions and harvestmen. Due to the absence of a dedicated olfactory/chemosensory appendange, spiders lack the associated neural processing regions found in most other arthropods. Spiders are also the only known chelicerates that lack immunoreactivity to proteins involved in arthropod learning and memory found in other arthropods. Instead, most of a spider’s protocerebrum, the first segment of its fused nervous system, is dedicated to visual processing. The size and organization of the visual processing regions of the protocerebrum varies across spider families.

 

How technology has changed medicine and its history?

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 02:58

 

How technology has changed medicine and  its history?

I am interested in finding out how far medicine has moved in solving a variety of problems related to human health, with and without technology. I would like to compare the challenges that are faced by modern medicine and that of a century ago. For example, cancer is still not conquered, previously unknown viruses appear with enviable regularity, antibiotics lose their strength, new habits and lifestyle bring new diseases. At the same time, we are at the epicenter of the genetic revolution, intensively studying the structure of the brain, relying on big data and robots, waiting for breakthroughs in the fight against aging. 

 

I am also interested in understanding how healthcare will be affected by an increase in the sophistication of technology. Personally, I predict that with technology we will see a rise in personalized therapy. This is because personal online doctors exist today, but over the coming decades they might dominate the professional environment. Not a single person interested in a healthy lifestyle will refuse instant access to expert opinion, especially if there is a convenient platform for this, and diagnostic tools are at hand. The work of the doctor will be similar to the work of a personal trainer and psychoanalyst. This idea is similar to what I have read in our book SHA about the physicians of the 19th century.

 

Discussion Questions: 

  1. I did not really understand what Abraham Flexner meant by “Medical students must be trained to regard the body as an infinitely complex machine”?

  2. Are Flexner’s suggestions for improving the medical education system still acknowledged today? I am asking this because we currently have more than 31 medical schools in the nation. How does this affect medical education today?

  3. How did the rise in medicine in the US affects medicine today? For example, the rise of cost in medical education, shortage of medical doctors, and the cost of medical care.

  4. How did the low “wage” for physicians like Brisbane affect mediccal practice? Was this the main contributor for the shift in public and private family dynamics?

Abraham Flexner and Modern Medicine

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 02:02

Abraham Flexner is a prominent figure in the history of modern medicine within the United States. He played a key role in introducing modern methods of teaching medicine in the United States. A report he published in 1908 criticized the quality of teaching medicine and the prestige of the 155 medical colleges at that time. He proposed two ways to revolutionize modern medicine. One way was to reduce the number of medical schools to 31. The other way was to ensure that medical schools are committed to medical research and academic excellence. Abraham Flexner’s ideas also had a heavy affect on American homeopathy. Among the main recommendations given in the Flexner report, there was a requirement that the curriculum of medical schools be based on generally accepted classical practice, which, in fact, put an end to the education of homeopathy in major hospitals.

 

Climate change

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/20/2019 - 01:49

Over the past 40 years, the bird population in the United States and Canada has declined by 29% or almost 3 billion birds. Research was conducted by American scientists at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. According to the results, of the 3 billion dead birds, 90% belong to common families, in particular sparrows, finches and swallows. They play an important role in food chains and support the functioning of ecosystems, such as pest control.

The study noted that bird losses in North America are similar to bird losses in other parts of the world. Co-author of the study, John Sauer, believes that the main factor that affects the extinction of birds is habitat loss, including due to intensive farming and urbanization. Scientists suggest that further climate change will worsen the situation.

 

 

Some interesting advices for science I picked up from a book

Submitted by imadjidov on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 14:43

The major source of knowledge include observation, experiment, and reasoning by induction and deduction. Exploring one’s own mind or soul to discover universal laws and solution to life’s greatest secrets.

The mediocre can be educated, but the geniuses educate themselves.

 

Science is a perpetual creative process.

 

There are no small problems. Problems that appear small are large problems that are not understood.

 

Nature is a harmonious mechanism where all parts, including those appearing to play a secondary role, cooperate in the functional whole. Nothing in nature is useless.

tiny brain COMPLEX BEHAVIOR

Submitted by imadjidov on Thu, 09/19/2019 - 14:36

It is logical to assume that a large brain size is needed to perform complex tasks. However, spiders seem to defy this trend by using tiny brains, small as the size of a pinhead, to produce sophisticated behaviors. Efficiency and compactness make the nervous system of spiders the perfect tool for studies in neurobiology. Their simple, yet efficient nervous system allows us to conduct and test hypotheses about the relationship between brain organization, connectivity, and behavior more easily than is possible in vertebrates. How is it possible that small sized animals such as spiders are able to show complex behaviors. My lab has recently found that we most of the behavior performed by the spider is due visual based. This finding has enabled us to perform physiological tests on the visual pathways on the brain of the spider.

In-class Exercises

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/13/2019 - 15:30
  • Woke up 

  • Fixed the bed

  • Took a shower

  • Put some clothes on

  • Walked downstairs to eat breakfast

  • Rushed out the door

  • Turned on the car and started to drive

  • Got stuck on BigE traffic

  • Drove for 30 minutes

  • Parked the vehicle in Lot12

  • Rushed to the bust stop

  • Missed the bus

  • Waited for another bus

  • Made it on time to class

  • Participated

  • Walked to the cafe and had breakfast

  • Advising some students during the advising hours

  • Met with a friend to finish a hw

  • Tried to get lunch, but realized card was left at the car

 

Activities in the house: (60 minutes)

  • Waking up

  • Fixing the bed

  • Taking a shower

  • Clothes 

  • Walking to the car

Vehicle: (60 minute)

  • Turning on the car and starting to drive

  • Getting stuck in traffic

  • Driving

  • Parking

Bus Stop: (30 minute)

  • Rushing to the bus stop

  • Missing the bus

  • Waiting for another bus

Campus: (180 minute)

  • Made it on time for class

  • Participated

  • Breakfast at the Cafe

Advising: (360 minutes)

  • Advised two students at the CNS office

Meeting: (60 minute)

  • Meeting to discuss homework

Bus Stop #2: (30 minute)

  • Leaving money in the car

  • Taking a bus back to the car

Lunch:

Muffin

 

I organized my daily activities as activities in the house, vehicle, bus stop, campus, advising, meeting, bus stop 2, and lunch. This morning I woke up without an alarm clock. I fixed my bed and took a shower. I did not have much time, so I quickly put on some clothes, and walked out to my car. I categorized such activities as being in my house. All such activities took a total of 60 minutes. The next activities took place in my vehicle. This consisted of turning on the car, getting stuck in traffic, and driving to the campus. All the activities took a total of 60 minutes. The next list of activities took place at the bus stop. I missed my first bus so I had to wait for another one. I made it to my morning class, I participated, and I had breakfast, which consisted of a single muffin. After my morning class, I did my advising hours. During advising, I helped two students with navigating Spire. After advising, I met with my classmate to work on homework that is due tonight. 

Leaf Perfect Paragraph

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/06/2019 - 15:40

The leaf reminds me of a shamrock due to the three leaves protruding out of its petiole. The two leaves attached at the side of the petiole are similar in size. Furthermore, the center most leaf has an upward curve. The top of the leaf has a smooth wet surface. In contrast, the bottom of the leaf had a chalky texture. The leaf colors also vary. The top of the leaf has a darker green color, while the bottom leaf is a lighter green color. The texture and color differences may be due to photosynthesis. The leaf must be adapted to absorb light so the top of the leaf problably has more chlorophyll. I noticed that each leaf has a midrib going through the center. The midrib starts thick near the petiole, but then decreases in thickness as it travels near the apex. The leaf I was given was noticeably veiny. Each leaf had around eight veins coming out from the midrib. The veins themselves had additional veins coming out of them. This reminded me of a blood under a microscope. The leaf had a musky, skunk like smell. It kind of reminded me of back home where we had lots of skunks running around. The unpleasant smell of the leaf might play a role in repelling insects and birds. What was very interesting for me were the quantitative measurements. The total width of the leaf was 7.2cm wide. The total length of the leaf was 7.2cm. I also noticed that the leaf always felt cold. It seems that the leaf does not hold to heat well.

 

 

 

Ibroxim Madjidov First Draft - LEAF OBSERVATION

Submitted by imadjidov on Fri, 09/06/2019 - 15:22

I was given a leaf to write about today. The leaf I was given reminded me of a shamrock because of its three leaves. The two leaves attached to the root were similar in shape. The leaf at the center had an upward curving leaf. The texture was noticably different on both sides. The top of the leaf had a smooth wet surface. In contrast, the bottom of the leaf had a chalky texture. The leaf colors also varied. The top of the leaf had a darker green color, while the bottom leaf was a lighter green color. The texture and color differences may be due to photosynthesis. The leaf must be adapted to absorb light so the top of the leaf problably has more chlorophyll. I noticed that each leaf has a midrib going through the center. The midrib starts thick near the petiole, but then decreases in thickness as it travels near the apex. The leaf I was given was noticeably veiny. Each leaf had around eight veins coming out from the midrib. The veins themselves had additional veins coming out of them. This reminded me of a blood under a microscope. The leaf had a musky, skunk like smell. It kind of reminded me of back home where we had lots of skunks running around. The unpleasant smell of the leaf might play a role in repelling insects and birds. What was very interesting for me were the quantitative measurements. The total width of the leaf was 7.2cm wide. The total length of the leaf was 7.2cm. I also noticed that the leaf always felt cold. It seems that the leaf does not hold to heat well.
 

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