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Vitamin B6

Submitted by malberigi on Thu, 04/19/2018 - 22:25

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridozine, naturally occurs in many foods we eat such as poultry, fish, starchy vegetables, and non-citrus fruits.  People may also choose to take a dietary supplement containing viatmin B6  in order to satisfy daily nutitional needs.  Vitamin B6 is required for more than 100 enzyme driven reactions involved in metabolism.  Healthy levels of vitamin B6 contribute largely to the production of modd influencing hormones such as serotonin and norepinephrine.  Vitamin B6 also assists with the conversion of carbohydrates in food into glucose for storage and ATP.  Most importantly, however, this key vitamin helps control levels of the amino acid homocysteine in the blood.  This amino acid is largely associated with heart disease, although more reasearch is needed to determine exactly how the two are interrelated. 

Food Color In Birds

Submitted by malberigi on Thu, 04/19/2018 - 22:17

Food color preference of avian foragers has not been widely studied.  In North America, the most common fruit color of bird-dispersed plants are red and black.  Other preferential fruit colors include blue and purple, while orange and green are rarely chosen (Janson 1983).  Fruit colors are commonly considered to increase the conspicuousness of ripe fruit in order to attract birds to disperse the enclosed seeds.  The preference of fruit color in avian foragers may be due to a variety of factors including background color, the prevalence of one color, and nutritional value associated with certain colors.  In our study, we would examine food color preferences of bird species in areas of the Amazon rainforest that are in need of ecological restoration. Frugivorous birds may play an important role in the restoration process due to their efficiency in seed dispersal (Gagetti, B L, et al, 1996).  We hope to direct the selection of plants that produce certain fruit colors to aid in the restoration of degraded forests

Monarch Migration

Submitted by malberigi on Wed, 04/18/2018 - 13:03

These fall monarchs look exactly like all other monarchs. However, they are physiologically different, and emerge from the pupa in a state called reproductive diapause. Diapause is basically a period of suspended development; these individuals do not have the mature internal sex organs (Monarch Butterfly Fund).  This allows them to stay alive until the next spring, when they’ll be able to fly north and lay eggs. This migration is the key part to success of the monarchs’ annual life cycle. At the end of the winter, monarchs end diapause, becoming ready to mate and lay eggs as they move northward. Once they become reproductively active, they’ll only live another few weeks. Their eggs then mark the start of another annual life cycle, as the first generation of monarchs is born again.

Lichen

Submitted by malberigi on Tue, 04/17/2018 - 19:54

A lichen consists of two or more partners that live together symbiotically, with both of them benefitting from the alliance.  One partner is a fungus termed as the mycobiont.  While the other is either an algae, photobiont (usually green) or a cyanobacterium, sometimes called blue-green algae although it is more closely related to bacteria than algae. The algae or cyanobacterium is able to use sunlight to produce essential nutrients by photosynthesis that feeds both organisms.  The fungus creates a foundation, known as a thallus, in which they both live.  The fungus also produces chemical compounds that may act as sunscreen to protect its photosynthetic partner.

Viatmin B6 Part 2

Submitted by malberigi on Tue, 04/17/2018 - 19:53

The many B vitamins found in beer, including B9 and B12, are all derived from the starch by which the drink is fermented.  Normally beer is made from malted barley, cereals, hops, yeast, and water, and provides others minerals to the body such as magnesium, potassium, and silicon.  It has been researched, though not intensely, the health benefits of beer especially in comparison to other forms of alcohol.  A beer, on average, will have less calories and sugar than a mixed drink of similar alcohol content.  Beer also provides protection against heart disease and other cardiovascular conditions in the same way red wine does.  Beer has also been studied to prove that it can reduce the risk of developing kidney stones by an incredible 40%.  Although there are many health benefits involved with the consumption of beer, these conditions change once the drink as been abused over a period of time.

Vitamin B6

Submitted by malberigi on Sun, 04/15/2018 - 12:15

Vitamin B6 (pyridozine) naturally occurs in many foods such as poultry, meats, fish, starchy vegetables, and non-citrus fruits.  People also may choose to take a dietary supplement containing the B6 vitamin in order to satisfy their daily needs.  Vitamin B6 is incredibly important for more than 100 enzyme reactions involved in metabolism.  Healthy levels of vitamin B6 contributes  largely to the production of hormones such as serotonin and norepinephrine, which influence mood.  Vitamin B6 also assists with the conversion of carbohydrates in food into glucose for storage and ATP.  Most importantly, however, this key vitamin helps control levels of the amino acid homocysteine in the blood.  This amino acid is largely associated with heart disease, although more reasearch is needed to determine exactly the two are interrelated. 

Corals

Submitted by malberigi on Thu, 04/12/2018 - 19:28

Corals live in nutrient poor waters and have certain zones of tolerance to water temperature, salinity, UV radiation, opacity, and nutrient quantities. Scleractinian corals build skeletons of calcium carbonate and when the coral polyp dies, this skeleton remains incorporated in the reef framework.  Scleractinian corals are in the Phylum Cnidaria, and they receive their nutrient and energy resources in two ways. They use the traditional cnidarian strategy of capturing tiny planktonic organisms with their nematocyst capped tentacles, as well as having a obligate symbiotic relationship with a autotrophic microalgaes known as zooxanthellae.  Zooxanthellae live symbiotically within the coral polyp tissues and assist the coral in nutrient production through photosynthetic activities. These activities provide the coral with fixed carbon compounds for energy, enhance calcification, and mediate elemental nutrient flux. The host coral polyp in return provides its zooxanthellae with a protected environment to live within, and a steady supply of carbon dioxide for its photosynthetic processes.  This symbiotic relationship between polyps and zooxanthellae can be disturbed by anthropogenic impacts including overfishing, increased sedimentation and nutrient overloading.

Brain Morphogenic Protein

Submitted by malberigi on Wed, 04/11/2018 - 15:35

Brain morphogenic protein (BMP) is involved in dorsal ventral patterning in most animals and dictates gene expression.  There are two antagonistic molecules that work to determine dorsal and ventral sides of an organism.  In insects, DPP is located on the dorsal side and SOG is located on the ventral side.  In the vertebrates, the dorsal side is chordin, and the ventral side has BMP4.  In hemichordates, BMP is located on the dorsal side and anti-BMP like molecule is located on the ventral side.  It makes them initially look like an insect.  BMP is secreted from the top of the neural tube and Shh is secreted from the bottom of the neural tube (floor plate)

 

 

ZENK Gene

Submitted by malberigi on Tue, 04/10/2018 - 22:45

When a bird hears a song, cells in the bird’s brain alter their biochemistry to alter gene expression and protein production that reshape cells in the learning center.  Allowing the bird to now do things it couldn’t before being exposed to the song.  One of the genes that contributes to these changes is ZENK which codes for a protein ZENK.  The ZENK protein is produced when a bird hears a song and is a transcription factor that regulates other genes influencing the way neurons interact with other neurons which can alter a bird’s behavior.

Role of Vasopressin in Prairie Voles

Submitted by malberigi on Tue, 04/10/2018 - 16:31

Vasopressin is a neurotransmitter that synapses on V1a receptors in the brain that provide the prairie vole (PV) with positive feedback for its monogamous mating behavior.  This V1a receptor is encoded by the avpr1a gene, which contains more DNA material in the PV than in the meadow vole and might account for more abundant V1a receptors in the prairie vole brain.  In order to test this hypothesis, the researchers inserted extra copies of the avpr1a gene into male PVs to see if more V1a receptors were produced.  The male PV with extra receptors did form stronger relationships with females, even if they had not previously mated with them proving this genes significance in PV monogamy

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