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Diabetes

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/26/2017 - 23:56

In type one diabetes there is defficiency in the amount of insulin produced. This is because the  immune system attacks the cells located in the pancreas produce insulin. The insulin is necessary in the body to absorb glucose which is needed to produce ATP. Type one diabetes is present in children. In type two diabetes the receptor becomes desensitized to insulin. This is called adult onset diabetes but it is becoming more common in children in recent years. Both of these diseases are similar in the sense they share the issue of high blood sugar.

Perfect Paragraph: Zebra fish Lab

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/26/2017 - 23:39

Our neurobiology lab recently studied the metabolism of zebra fish. Since oxygen consumption is directly related to the metabolic rate we could measure this with an oxygen electrode. We studied the effect of stressors on metabolic rate but due to time contraints, we were only able to test one stressor: habitat volume. The experiment was conducted by using the oxygen electrode to meaure oxygen consumption inide a container covered by parafilm so no air could enter. The fish were in place in small, medium, and large containers. We did not get the results that we had expected. The rate of consumption was higher in large containers. We attributed this to the fact that the smaller container caused the fish to sit still as it could not swim around while in the larger container the fish could swim freely.

Final Project Selection

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/26/2017 - 23:05

After discussing other options for my project subject, we chose to study the microorganisms that live on moss. If you take a sample off moss and float it in a container of water, you can observe the organisms that live on it. This is possible because if the moss is floated upside-down, the orgaisms will come loose and fall to the bottom of the container. After this, you can collect and observe these creatures. We thought that it we could count and catagorize the types of organisms we found. This could be done with some internet research and microscopes.

Selecting A Project

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/26/2017 - 22:50

Our group had to consider several factors when creating a project. When brainstorming we thought that water retention may be a possible subject. We initially wanted to look at nutrients and their effect on moss growth. Phosporus, Potassium and nitrogen were all elements that we thought we may be able to manipulate in this experiment.  An issue with this would be the difficulty in measuring the plant growth. We ended up choosing not to do this idea because the data provided from such an experiment would probably not be significant enough for the purpose of the project. 

Perfect Paragraph week 5: Sugar Gliders

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/05/2017 - 23:48

Approximately 1 year ago, I adopted 2 sugar gliders. Since then they have had one joey (baby sugar glider) and I now keep the 3 as pets. Sugar gliders are marsupials which means they are mammals that keep their young in a pouch. They are housed in a large 5 ft tall cage with ropes, toys and pouches for them to play in. They have dietary restrictions so I have to make them special balanced meals. They are supposed to consume about 50%  fruits and veggies as well as 50% protien. I use HPW, mealworms, and yogurt to provide the protien and I try to keep the fruits and vegetables varied from week to week. The most effienct way to make them food is to chop up their fruits and vegetables ahead of time (generally right after I go shopping)  and then freeze them. They only consume a small amount each day and I don't want the food to spoil. I also suppliment this with gliderade which is a powedered substance that is mixed with water to create a nectar-like liquid. In their natural habitat sugar gliders frequently consume nectar so this is one of their favorite things to eat. 

sugar glider food

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/05/2017 - 23:38

I currently have 3 sugar gliders as pets. They are housed in a large 5 ft tall cage and have a special diet so I have to make them balanced meals. They are supposed to consume about 1/2 fruits and veggies and 1/2 protien. I use HPW, mealworms, and yogurt to provide the protien and I try to keep the fruits and vegetables varied from week to week.I have found that the most effienct way to make them food is to chop up their fruits and vegetables ahead of time and then freeze them as they do not eat much each day and I don't want the food to spoil. I also suppliment this with gliderade which is a powedered substance that is mixed with water to create a nectar-like liquid. In their natural habitat sugar gliders frequently consum nectar so this is one of their favorite things to eat. 

Differences in Images from Methods

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 03/05/2017 - 23:31

There were several somewhat uncontrollable differences between the image I created for my methods project and the one that was replicated.  The lighting in all of the replicated pictures is much brighter than that of the originals, leading me to believe they were taken at a different time of day. This could also be due to the type of device used to capture the images (ie iphone, android or camera as well as the model type) Additionally the amount of snow in the replicated images was lessened significantly. This is a factor that we could not control because the replicated images had to be taken some time after my methods were complete. As the weather became warmer over the course of a few days, the snow melted and this affected the images produced.

Moss Journal- Resilience of moss in northern ecosystems

Submitted by rfredericks on Fri, 03/03/2017 - 13:58

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2012.04254.x/full

In this journal they tested the resiliance of moss and their role in ecological stability. They used model simulations to test this theory. If we were able to grow moss in several different conditions we could replicate this experiment. Some of the moss tested was in northern high lattitude regions, we could likely still preform an experiment but the conditions would be somewhat different as we are not in a boreal/arctic ecosystem.

Week 4 Perfect Paragraph: Mussel Muscle Lab

Submitted by rfredericks on Mon, 02/27/2017 - 00:10

In my neurobiology and physiology lab we have been studying the anterior byssal retractor muscle in mussels. This is a catch muscle which means it can sustain contractions for long periods of time. I decided to test the effects of temperature on its ability to contract. We used a force transducer to detect the strength of contraction and electrodes to shock the muscle. We tested 5 temperatures: room temperature, ice bath,  refridgerator, and then we heated 2 additionall mussels by warming water on a hot plate. I used instant ocean (or synthetic ocean water) to keep the mussels moist. Between trials we would cover the mussel with instant ocean with a pipet. The instant ocean also kept the mussels from warming or cooling as they were exposed to the room temperature air. The temperatures at which we stored the mussels were 0, 5, 23, 35, and 45 degrees celsius. I hypothesized that the warmer mussels would contract with greater force. This is true in humans because more hemoglobin reaches the muscle tissue. Hemoglobin is blood that carries oxygen and it aids in the aerobic respiration.

Mussel Muscle Lab

Submitted by rfredericks on Sun, 02/26/2017 - 23:19

In my neurobiology and physiology lab we are have been studying the anterior byssal retractor muscle in mussels. We had to design our own experiment and I decided to test the effects of temperature on its ability to contract. We used a a force transducer to detect the strength of contraction and electrodes to shock the muscle. We tested 5 temperatures: room temperature, on an ice bath, from the refridgerator, and then we heated 2 additionall mussels by warming water on a hot plate. I used instant ocean (or synthetic ocean water) to keep the mussels moist. Additionally we stored the instant ocean at the target temperature to help keep the mussel close to the temperature it was supposed to be. The temperatures of each mussel ended up being about 0, 5, 23, 35, and 45 degrees celsius. I hypothesized that the mussels that were warmer would contract with greater force. This is how it is in humans because the heat causes more blood carry hemoglobin to reach the muscle tissues. Hemoglobin is blood carrying oxygen and it aids in the aerobic respiration.

 

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