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Methods Introduction Perfect Paragraph

Submitted by jgcahoon on Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:41

There are many different trees on the UMass campus and they are all unique in their own way. There is one species of tree that I bet most people didn’t know was present on campus. The tree I am referring to is the Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides Taxodiaceae), located behind Morrill 3. This type of tree is usually associated with the west coast, so finding one of these at UMass opened my eyes. At this location, there are three redwoods all next each other, and they all have their signature red-brownish color and are tall. The dawn redwoods have some other important characteristics, including a typically tall trunk and various upright spreading branches that extend from a very straight trunk. Although most people associate the trunks of these trees to be large, this species located on campus has a normal trunk. I chose to focus on this organism because it is easy to locate and should be easy to replicate since the tree can’t move. When I was taking a picture of this species, I thought about both the angle and direction of the picture and about the time of day. I never seen this type of tree before and have always wanted to, so it should be an interesting organism to use for this project. 

Climate Change Assignment

Submitted by jgcahoon on Wed, 09/20/2017 - 20:42

From this population size data, I believe this species was at its northernmost part of its range in this area, because the number of them in the area is diminishing over the last 15 years. When the study first started, there was quite a few of these marsupials, but climate change has caused them to move south. The graph shows the population size initially being very high, but the range in which this species can inhabit is moving south and out of the observation range. This is seen as a decrease in population size on the graph. The marsupials are almost “following” their temperature range, which is moving them farther down Chile. 

Find a Figure Activity

Submitted by jgcahoon on Tue, 09/19/2017 - 17:54

The article, “Seasonal Variation in Soil Greenhouse Gas Emissions at Three-Age Stages of Dawn Redwood (metasequoia glyptostroboides) Stands in an Alluvial Island, Eastern China” contains many different figures referring to a variety of things, including monthly mean air temperature and precipitation for various Dawn Redwoods. One figure that stuck out to me for its very nice quality was figure 3 about N2O emissions during different seasons (i.e. growing/nongrowing seasons). What was found was that these emissions were higher during the growing season when compared to the nongrowing season. This figure does a nice job visually capturing all the data while still giving us just the right amount of information we need to understand it. I like how the different seasons are sorted vertically, while the different emissions (CH4, CO2, and N2O) are sorted horizontally. Looking specifically at each graph, each one has a bell curve on it with various bars. I liked how each plot showed the mean, standard deviation, and sample size, as I believe these numbers are very important to know, especially the sample size. By giving us these numbers with all the graphs organized in a nice way, it makes it very easy for the reader to read the data from this figure. Lastly, the bell curve is a nice touch to these figures, as it not only shows the average at the peak, but also the general flow of the data. 

In-Class Activity 9/15

Submitted by jgcahoon on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 15:07

Living off campus can make transportation a bit difficult, and my day was filled with a lot of travel. At 6:30am, I drove my car to campus and then walked 15 minutes to work. After getting out of work at 10:30am, I walked back to my car and drove back home to relax before I had class. At 12:20pm, the bus picked me up about 2 minutes from my house and I arrived on campus at about 12:35pm. After class, the bus took me back home at about 4:05pm. Lastly, I grabbed my last and final bus of the day at 10:22pm to go to the bars. At about 12:45am, I walked home.

Despite having a very busy day on Thursday, there was still plenty of time for me to eat a lot of food. For breakfast before work, I ate a yogurt and drank some milk. I was very hungry after work, so I stopped my Harvest at the Campus Center to grab a sandwich, a banana, and some water. This kept me satisfied up until after my two classes, where I then grabbed some Chinese food, specifically some orange chicken and vegetables. After my homework was done and before I went to the bars, I made myself a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

I also had a lot of time to do some fun things as well throughout my day. When I returned home from work, I watched some Sportscenter for an hour. For the next 9 hours, my day was very busy, up until after I finished my homework and went to the bar McMurphy’s with my friends. We all drank some beer and after an hour or two, we went over my friend’s house on Philips Street to hang out for a little. After about 30 minutes, we were all tired from our day, so we went home.

Thursdays are my busiest days, and there was a lot of work for me to do. First, I had work at the Franklin dining common from 7-10:30am, where I worked in the dishroom. I had a few hours off, and then had Ecology at 1:00 and Geography at 2:30, both in the same room luckily, so I didn’t have to move much. Later at night before I started to relax and I read the Methods project and worked a little bit on my introduction. 

Methods Project Introduction

Submitted by jgcahoon on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 12:59

There are many different trees on the UMass campus and each one of them are unique in their own way. There is one species of tree that I bet most people here at UMass Amherst didn’t know was present on campus. The tree I am referring to is the Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides Taxodiaceae), located behind Morrill 3. This type of tree is usually associated with the west coast, so finding one of these at UMass opened my eyes. At this location, there are three redwoods all next each other, and they all have their signature red-brownish color and are tall. I chose to focus on this organism because it is easy to locate and should be easy to replicate since the tree can’t move. I have also never seen this type of tree before and have always wanted to, so it should be an interesting organism to use for this project. 

Perfect Paragraph 1

Submitted by jgcahoon on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:25

This organism placed in front of me has very similar features to those of other larva I have seen, but I am unsure whether it is actually one. It is about 2 centimeters long, with its body making up nearly all of this length (i.e. head and feet are very small). I noticed that the front legs contribute the most to the movment of this organism, which causes the body to move as segments. Also, the back legs seem to be less involved in movement, and could be used for suction. I wanted to see how this larva-like creature would react under stress, so using my pencil, I pushed the organism onto its back. In this position, the organism was able to quickly and easily flip itself back over. Despite being strong enough to do this, it is still unable to climb up the sides of the cup, and spends most of its time around the edge of the cup rather than the middle. Lastly, I noticed the tips of its feet are black, which makes me wonder if they're used for gathering sensory information at all. The only other question I have is whether or not the objects placed with this organism are food or just miscellaneous objects from the container they were in. These objects look and feel wood-like, and have a fairly similar color as the organism. I wonder if this helps aid the organism in hiding.

First In Class Activity

Submitted by jgcahoon on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:13

- Body moves as segments

- Is the food in the container too or just pieces of wood?

- Front legs are much longer and seem to contribute the most to the organism's movement

- Likes being near the edge of the cup

- not strong enough to pull itself up the walls of the cup

- has the ability the flip itself over if it ends up on its back

- feet have black spots on the end of them

- is the tail/back part used for gathering any sensory information?

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