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Final Draft Ecology Assignment

Submitted by hamacdonald on Sat, 09/23/2017 - 19:40

The species, monito del monte, Dromiciops gliroides native to the South Western part of Argentina and Chile. Due to its location south of the equator  it would most likely shift downward, away from the equator. The reason for this being is global warming is slowly warming the earths surface temperatures making this location no longer suitable for the monito del monte. Although this shift is relatively slow, maybe only a few degrees higher this makes a substantial difference to the specie. This is proven in the graph, "Change in population size of Dromiciops gliroides in the study area" as the number of monito del monte drastically declines from around 1600 in 2002 to 600 in 2016. This once suitable location for the species has warmed gradually to a temperature that does not support the needs of the species. Therefore, it has caused them to slowly shift downward away from the equator and find a new location with a more suitable to their temperature needs.

   It would be expected that this red star is the northernmost part of its range. Based on both the graph and the patterns of global warming heating the earths surface. The graph shows a steady decrease in the monito del monte in this area starting at around 1600 individuals in 2000-2002 and decreasing to as little as 600 in 2014-2016. This suggests that they are migrating out of this area. Given the center of a distribution range should be the highest population, would prove that this decreasing population is not the center of the range. Due to global warmings trends of heating up the earths surface, the monito del monte would logically go downward away from the equator to cooler regions. Their old location is no longer suitable to their lifestyle, proven by the Change in population size of Dromiciops gliroides in the study area” graph.

Starting Methods Project

Submitted by hamacdonald on Fri, 09/22/2017 - 12:53

When looking through the garden outside of Frank dining hall, I came across a funny plant, Hypericum perforatum, more commonly known as, “St John’s Wort”. Having never heard of it before, I think it would be perfect for this project and for me to learn about something new. The description on the plant in the garden says, “Tea Herb, Medicinal”. This triggered my attention, what is this plant used for?

St Johns Wort falls under the Hypericaceae family. It is known for its medicinal traits in treating depression. The name St John’s Wort comes from the traditional harvesting on June 24th, St John’s Day.  The genus name Hypericum is created from the Greek words hyper and eikon meaning above picture. This is why some people believe if they hang these plants over religious photos on St John’s day it will ward off evil spirits.

Replicating the picture I took of these the plant shouldn’t be too hard. I went to Frank around 6 PM. One factor that will have to be controlled is waiting for no bees to be on the flowers. I personally waited for a bee to fly away because this would be easier to replicate no bee present on the flower. Some factors out of my control are if someone comes and picks these flowers or if any weather factors effect the plant in anyway.

Ecology Assignment

Submitted by hamacdonald on Thu, 09/21/2017 - 15:28

The species monito del monte, Dromiciops gliroides,  would most likely shift downward away from the equator. The reason for this being is global warming is slowly warming the earths surface temperatures making this location no longer suitable for the monito del monte. This is proven in the graph, "Change in population size of Dromiciops gliroides in the study area" as the number of  monito del monte drastically declines from around 1600 in 2002 to 600 in 2016. This once suitable location for the species has warmed gradually to a temperature that does not support the needs of the species. Therefore it has caused them to slowly shift downward away from the equator and find a new location with a more suitable to their temperature needs.

in class daily activity

Submitted by hamacdonald on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 15:50

Food:

During the day I eat several times. The first time I ate was around 9:00 AM in the morning at the Hampshire dining hall with my roommates. This required driving from our house to the visitors lot. We than walked to the dining hall. For breakfast I had eggs, baked beans, corn beef hash, and toast with cream cheese. I also had water and an iced coffee. For my second and last meal of the day I ate a buffalo chicken wrap from Brunos pizza. This entailed ordering the food and driving to go pick it up. In my buffalo chicken wrap I had lettuce, tomato, banana peppers, black olives, blue cheese, and buffalo chicken. I ate this in my kitchen at around 4:00 PM. 

Maggot Observation

Submitted by hamacdonald on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:16

Small maggot roughly two centimeters long and three millimeters wide. It has a squishy skin layer covering the majority of its body with a yellowish-tan color. It is broken up into sections about every millimeter up the organism. It is thickest in the middle and thinnest at either “tail” and “head” end.

 The head is made up of a different kind of material and is roughly the size of a pen tip. The head is similar in color and in texture to that of a popcorn kernel. The head seems to slightly retract into the body, similarly to that of a turtles head. It appears to have two small pinches around the mouth area. It has small hairs off it sides.

Movement appears to begin in the tail region flowing through to the head region pushing it forward. It has many small brown legs that assist in this motion. The legs are symmetrical on either side of the maggot and seem to be used differently in the head vs the tail region. It contains three pairs of legs in the front region by the mouth. These three pairs seem to be used to sense the surrounding, comparable more to hands. These legs are far more active and appear longer and thinner than the other legs. It also has four pairs of legs in the middle region. Separated from the front legs by around one millimeter. These legs are darker black and stumpier than the head region legs. In the tail region the maggot has one pair of legs. These are the smallest and seem to assist in the beginning of motion.

In general, the maggot seems to keep all of its legs on the bottom of the surface and walks in the grooves of the container. 

Maggot Observation

Submitted by hamacdonald on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:16

Small maggot roughly two centimeters long and three millimeters wide. It has a squishy skin layer covering the majority of its body with a yellowish-tan color. It is broken up into sections about every millimeter up the organism. It is thickest in the middle and thinnest at either “tail” and “head” end.

 The head is made up of a different kind of material and is roughly the size of a pen tip. The head is similar in color and in texture to that of a popcorn kernel. The head seems to slightly retract into the body, similarly to that of a turtles head. It appears to have two small pinches around the mouth area. It has small hairs off it sides.

Movement appears to begin in the tail region flowing through to the head region pushing it forward. It has many small brown legs that assist in this motion. The legs are symmetrical on either side of the maggot and seem to be used differently in the head vs the tail region. It contains three pairs of legs in the front region by the mouth. These three pairs seem to be used to sense the surrounding, comparable more to hands. These legs are far more active and appear longer and thinner than the other legs. It also has four pairs of legs in the middle region. Separated from the front legs by around one millimeter. These legs are darker black and stumpier than the head region legs. In the tail region the maggot has one pair of legs. These are the smallest and seem to assist in the beginning of motion.

In general, the maggot seems to keep all of its legs on the bottom of the surface and walks in the grooves of the container. 

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