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Beginning of methods project

Submitted by briangriffin on Thu, 09/21/2017 - 16:06

        For my methods project I will be using the species Tillandsia cyanea. This species is a type of plant found on campus in the Durfee conservatory. I chose this plant because it is relatively easy to find and it is most likely going to be in the same location at a future date when someone replicates my methods. Also there is a placard next to the plant identifying the species. Therefore there less of a chance of someone misindetifying the exact organism described in my project. This orangism lives inside the Durfee greenhouse, this means that time of day wont really affect the shadows and lighting of the photo. But if there's a difference in cloud cover at the time of the photos, this might have an effect on the lighting since the greenhouse is translucent. Factors to control include where the photo is taken from, flash being on or off, and if there is water on the plant if it has recently been watered. 

        This species has many morpholocial characteristics to describe for the purpose of this methods project. The are many leaves on this plant that seem to start at the base. These leaves tend to be about 12-18 inches wide and about .4-.8 inches wide and come to a point at the end. There is a couple brightly pink colored flower stock with a hard exterior. They have an overlapping V shape that seems to get smaller and tighter at the end of the flower stock. The are no actual flowers at the time the photo was taken.

Classes Perfect paragraph

Submitted by briangriffin on Thu, 09/21/2017 - 15:28

         As a college student I am enrolled in multiple classes and every day I attend these classes. Classes are blocks of times where I sit in a room with other students and a professor or a teacher’s assistant. During this time we discuss topics taught in the specific class. Yesterday was Thursday so I attended my Thursday classes, which includes Evolutionary genetics, Ecology, and advanced genetics. Evolutionary genetics takes place between 10:00-11:15am and yesterday we discussed a paper that was assigned to us for reading in the previous class. Ecology takes place between 1:00-1:15pm and yesterday we learned about climate change in a lecture format. In a lecture style class I am mostly taking notes and listening to the professor lecture on the subject. But there was discussion when questions were asked by her and by students. My last class of the day was advanced genetics which took place between 2:15-2:30. In this class we are in assigned groups and yesterday we discussed the papers that each member of my group researched prior to that class. Classes have different formats and cover different subjects, this variation is shown by the classes I attended yesterday.

CO1

Submitted by briangriffin on Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:59

               Cytochrome Oxidase 1 (CO1) is a mitochondrial gene referred to as the barcode gene. This gene is used widely in entomology and other fields for identifying species. The reason of its widespread use is due to the fact that it accumulates mutations at a rapid rate among populations. This is because it is a mitochondrial gene with not too many constraints on the gene itself. This means that when a mutation occurs it is less likely to be deleterious. These factors led to its popularity in many fields of biology. The Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) was created for people to upload their CO1 sequences. This database only has CO1 sequences but for many different species and contains more CO1 sequences than NCBI. In my lab we used CO1 to identify a possible new species of Pimpla which is a genus of parasitic wasps. The wasp found parasitizing winter moths was identified by a taxonomist as Pimpla aequalis but when the CO1 sequence of this wasp was compared to that of Pimpla aequalis, there was about a 10% difference in this gene. This demonstrates one use of the Barcode gene in regards to research.

Classes

Submitted by briangriffin on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 15:11

                As a college student I am enrolled in multiple classes and every day I attend these classes. Classes are blocks of times where I sit in a room with other students and a professor. During this time we discuss topics covered by the specific class. Yesterday was Thursday so I attended my Thursday classes, which includes Evolutionary genetics, Ecology, and advanced genetics. Evolutionary genetics take place between 10:00-11:15am and yesterday we discussed a paper that was assigned to us in the previous class. Ecology takes place between 1:00-1:15pm and yesterday we learned about climate change in a lecture format. There was discussion when questions were asked by her and by students but mostly in this style of class I am taking notes and listening to the professor. My last class of the day was advanced genetics which took place between 2:15-2:30. In this class we are in assigned groups and yesterday we discussed the papers that each member researched before that class. Classes have different formats and are about different subjects, shown by the classes I attended yesterday.

Insect Observation

Submitted by briangriffin on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:32

I have an organism in my plastic cup. This organism is a multicellular eukaryote in the metazoan clade. More specifically, it is an arthropod of some sort. My best guess is that it is an insect in the order Lepidoptera. The organism appears to be in the larval stage of its life. I'm able to see that it has no wings, many small legs, and many repeated body segments. Its head is brown while the rest of the body is a pale yellowish color with small brown spots in some areas of the body, especially around the legs. Using a ruler I am able to determine that the organism is about 2 centimeters long and 0.4 centimeters wide. Its posterior most segment has two legs and the middle section of legs has eight while the front section has six legs. All three sets of these legs appear to be different. The front six appear to be true legs used for movement and interacting with the environment. The back legs seem to not move much and could possibly be for support. It seems to move using an accordion like motion starting from the back and ending in the front. On its side there are small hairs along with two small antenna at the anterior portion of the head, presumably for sensing the environment.

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