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Perfect Paragraph 2 (Week of 9/18-9/24)

Submitted by jmazzola on Sat, 09/23/2017 - 15:00

     Recently, a feldspar mineral by the name of Labradorite has become popular as more have discovered the stone’s beautiful “flashing” color when shown under light. This unique iridescent phenomena is called “labradoresence”, named especially for the stone. The mechanism of this color play is the result of light shining through the rock, striking what’s called a “twinning surface” and then reflecting off and thus producing the iridescent colors. These colors, which are often compared to those of aurora borealis, are comprised of brilliant blue, green, golden yellow or purple shades, while the primary color of the rock is usually gray with black lines running through it. Labradorite species that show all of these colors mostly covering the whole surface of the piece are known as “spectrolite”, which is considered to be the highest quality of the stone, primarily found in Finland or Madagascar, but sometimes can also be found at it’s original discovery site in Labrador, Canada. The beauty of this stone did not go completely unnoticed in the past however, as some religious groups in the northern hemisphere called the stone “frozen fire”. It was said back then that pieces of it had fallen down from the Northern lights, or that the stone originated on Earth primarily but trapped the “fragments” from the spectacle within. So clearly, given it’s unique properties and past, it is no surprise that this stone has gained much popularity in the jewelry industry in recent years.

Labradorite

Submitted by jmazzola on Fri, 09/22/2017 - 02:20

      Labradorite is a feldspar mineral originally founded in Labrador Island, Canada around the 1700s. Recently, this mineral has become popular as more individuals have discovered it’s beautiful “flashing” color when shown under light; this iridescent coloring is known as “labradoresence”, named especially because it is a light phenomenon unique to the mineral. The mechanism of this color play is the result of light shining through the rock, striking what’s called a “twinning surface” and then reflecting off and thus producing the iridescent colors. The colors, which often compared to those of aurora borealis, are comprised of blue, green, golden yellow or purple shades, while the primary color of the rock is usually gray. Labradorite pieces that have all of these colors covering the whole surface are known as “spectrolite”, which is considered to be the highest quality of the stone, primarily found in Finland or Madagascar. Some religious groups in the northern hemisphere deemed this stone as “frozen fire” that had fallen down from the Northern lights, or as a stone on Earth that contained “fragments” of this spectacle. 

A maple leaf

Submitted by jmazzola on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 15:38

Figure 1: An example of an orange maple leaf that will soon be falling off due to the approaching winter season.

Waking up

Submitted by jmazzola on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 15:21

       As someone who has earned the title “night owl”, I am not usually one to wake up in an efficient manner and as such, there is a multitude of steps I take to ensure I wake up. I am a college student, so I have classes everyday of the week, all of which start at either 10am or 10:50am. In order to make it to class in timely manner most of the time, I must set my alarm to wake up a good hour and a half to two hours prior to the start of the class. On the days when I have a 10am, I wake up at 8:30am in order to compensate for sleep inertia or just not getting out of bed immediately. The alarm I set is in my phone, which where I found the most ease in making a good alarm. I can make it so that my alarm will go off every 10 minutes until I fully dismiss it. I also can change the type of alarm sound, which I especially make sure to do every night because I’ve found that my brain learns to recognize and desensitize to a specific sound if I use that same sound as my alarm every day. Essentially, if I use the same alarm sound, I will not fully wake up. Finally, I also make sure to set my phone down in an area that is not within arms reach so that I must physically get out of bed to turn it off, helping to shake off sleepiness when I get up. It is because of these actions that I am able to wake up the majority of the time. On occasion I will make a mistake, maybe I’ll turn off the alarm instead of snoozing it, but for the most part I’m able to get ready to go to class. Whether or not I make it to class on time from this point on is solely dependent on how long it took for me to get up, or just my focus on the task.

(Not so) Perfect Paragraph 1 (Week of 9/11-9/17)

Submitted by jmazzola on Fri, 09/15/2017 - 14:17

       An organism, presumed to be a mealworm or some other kind of insect larvae, was observed in a 2 inch plastic cup. In attempt to identify the organism, all details and behaviors were explored. The subject was definetly alive and well, immediately starting to move around to explore it’s new environment. The actual movements are not very fast, and it would seem that it cannot climb up vertically. However, it does seem to be fine crawling around and over objects in it’s way. The body is a light yellowish tan in color and somewhat translucent, with the presumed “head” being a darker brown. One is able to see what appears to be a small mouth area at the “head”, where it appears to have tiny pinchers. It’s body seems to have three primary sections to it, with a faint long line down the middle, on the dorsal/top side. The subject was measured to be about 2 cm in length, and 0.7 cm wide at the middle. It also has quite a few sets of appendages that are spread out along the bottom of it’s body. A total of six appendages were counted in the front closest to it’s presumed head, a total of eight in the middle, which were of different appearance and so possibly different structure than the first grouping. The middle grouping was interesting, as they also appeared to be retractable. At the back, there may be third type of appendage but it was the most set apart from all to them in appearance so it was unclear. The overall bottom/ventral side of it’s body is a more pale color, and when rolled onto it’s side the insect is very capable of rolling back onto it’s appendages. Not too many insect larvae carry this characteristic, most usually have very limited options for movement presumably because it is not needed. So it would appear that while most of the observable aspects of the insect are generic, there a few unique features, like it’s decent mobility, which might assist in the identification of the organism.

 

(I apologize for this not being so smooth, I haven't written in awhile! - but thats what comments are for!)

In-Class Writing Activity 1

Submitted by jmazzola on Fri, 09/08/2017 - 15:12

A mealworm was placed in a 2 inch plastic cup with a couple pieces of debris, most likely from the previous enclosure it was in. The mealworm is definetly alive and well, immediately starting to move around to explore it’s new environment. The movements are not very fast, and it would seem that it cannot climb up vertically. The body is a light yellowish tan in color and somewhat translucent, with the presumed “head” being a darker brown. With the naked eye one is able to see what appears to be a small mouth area, where it appears to have tiny pinchers. It does not appear to have eyes, and if so they are not complex.

It’s body seems to have three “sections” to it, with a faint long line down the middle, on the dorsal/top side. It totals about 2 cm in length, and is 0.7 cm wide at the middle. It has quite a few sets of appendages that are spread out along the bottom of it’s body. A set of six in the from closest to it’s head, a set of 8 in the middle - and of different appearance/possibly different structure than the first set, and what might be a set of two back appendages that definetly are not similar to the others. The middle set of appendages seem to be retractable.

The bottom/ventral side of it’s body is a more pale color, and when rolled onto it’s side the insect is very capable of rolling back onto it’s appendages. Bilateral symmetry.

It’s “skin” appears to be leathery/wrinkly in texture, and is soft to the touch. Very small “hairs” can also be observed coming out from all along it’s body. It appears to be able to use these “hairs” for detection of objects around it as well as it’s front legs.

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